Category: Reverse Triangular Merger

Reverse Triangular Merger: A merger transaction can be structured as a straight acquisition with the acquiring company remaining in control, a reverse merger or a reverse triangular merger…

Oct202015

Mergers And Acquisitions – The Merger Transaction

ABA Journal’s 10th Annual Blawg 100

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Although I have written about document requirements in a merger transaction previously, with the recent booming M&A marketplace, it is worth revisiting.  This blog only addresses friendly negotiated transactions achieved through share exchange or merger agreements.  It does not address hostile takeovers.  

A merger transaction can be structured as a straight acquisition with the acquiring company remaining in control, a reverse merger or a reverse triangular merger.  In a reverse merger process, the target company shareholders exchange their shares for either new or existing shares of the public company so that at the end of the transaction, the shareholders of the target company own a majority of the acquiring public company and the target company has become a wholly owned subsidiary of the public company.  The public company assumes the operations of the target company.    

A reverse merger is often structured as a reverse triangular merger.  In that case, the acquiring company forms

Mar182014

Guide to Reverse Merger Transaction

What is a reverse merger?  What is the process?

A reverse merger is the most common alternative to an initial public offering (IPO) or direct public offering (DPO) for a company seeking to go public.  A “reverse merger” allows a privately held company to go public by acquiring a controlling interest in, and merging with, a public operating or public shell company.  The SEC defines a “shell company” as a publically traded company with (1) no or nominal operations and (2) either no or nominal assets or assets consisting solely of any amount of cash and cash equivalents.

In a reverse merger process, the private operating company shareholders exchange their shares of the private company for either new or existing shares of the public company so that